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PIXABLE DATA: These Are The Most Dangerous States In America To Be A Woman/ Pixable

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http://www.pixable.com/article/the-most-dangerous-states-in-america-to-be-a-woman-69100?utm_medium=partner&utm_source=facebook&utm_campaign=pixlssocial

Every nine seconds, a woman is assaulted in the U.S.A. This statistic from the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence may seem shocking, but not when you take into account that one third of American women will be sexually assaulted within their lifetime — one third. That means one out of every three women you know (your sisters, daughters, mothers and friends) will likely fall victim to this awful crime.

The true scope of how many women have been attacked or victimized, especially by people they know, is terrifying. What’s even more terrifying is everything we don’t know. The last published results of the National Intimate Partner and Violence Survey are from 2010.

The closest we could get to finding real, recent answers on the frequency of sexual assault and rape in the last couple of years is from the FBI. The legal definition of rape was recently changed to include both male and female victims, but the FBI still includes statistics of the legacy definition (female victims only) in their annual crime report. We expected the FBI’s crime report to more or less match the figures from the CDC’s 2010 survey, but we noticed a drastically low number of rape victims — roughly 26 women per 100,000 people.

That’s when we realized a key fact. The FBI is basing their figures on arrests and convictions, excluding statutory rape and incest and only documenting “forcible rape.” The sad truth is that most rapes go unreported — with forcible rapes making up only a fraction of all reported rapes — and even less rapists are actually convicted. According to RAINN less than half of all rapes are reported, only 12% of what is reported actually leads to an arrest and only 3% of rapists see punishment for their actions.

When it comes to violence against women, not every zip code is equal, and some places are more dangerous than others. We’ve examined statistics from the FBI, the CDC’s 2010 comprehensive National Intimate Partner And Violence Survey and the U.S. Census Bureau to narrow down the most dangerous places for women in the United States from 2010 – 2014.
One out every six women in the U.S.A. was a victim of an attempted or completed rape in 2010.

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Places like Alaska and Oregon hold the highest rates of rape against women, whereas states like Virginia and California hold some of the lowest rates. The 2014 information from the FBI also shows a different perspective than that of the above statistics from the CDC. While many of the same states are still on the top 10 list, some new states appear as well. This could be for a number of reasons. There could have been an increase or decrease in crime in the last four years among certain states or some states could just have a higher rate of conviction due to differing justice systems.
The 10 states with the largest percentage of women in 2010 who said they were raped in their lifetime are:

1. Alaska (21%)
2. Oregon (21%)
3. Michigan (20%)
4. Nevada (18.8%)
5. New Hampshire (18.7%)
6. Oklahoma (18.6%)
7. Washington (18%)
8. Colorado (18%)
9. Minnesota (16.9%
10. Connecticut (16.9 %)
In 2014, These were the states with the most rapes per 100,000 according to the FBI

1. Alaska (75.3)
2. New Mexico (51.4)
3. South Dakota (48.4)
4. Montana (42)
5. Michigan (40.9)
6. Arkansas (39.8)
7. Colorado (39.6)
8. North Dakota (37.3)
9. Kansas (37)
10. Arizona (36.6)
Sexual crimes against women (other than rape) are even more commonplace. These results from the 2010 CDC report are eye-opening.

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At the lowest rate, which occurs in Louisiana, 22% of women have experienced sexual violence other than rape. Most states fall somewhere between the 30 and 35% mark, while others like Oregon see 43% of women falling victim to non-rape sexual violence. The 10 states where women are most frequently sexually assaulted are:

1. Oregon (43.3%)
2. Alaska (42%)
3. Maryland (41.9%)
4. New Hampshire (40.8%)
5. Washington (40.5%)
6. Illinois (38.6%)
7. North Carolina (38.3%)
8. New York (38%)
9. Connecticut (37.2%)
10. Kentucky (36.8%)
One of the most obvious ways to determine if a place is dangerous is by looking at the murder rate. The murder rate for females in 2010 was notably higher in certain states.

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States in the southern half of the United States have a notably higher murder rate among females than states in the northern half. Southern states also have looser gun laws.
According to the CDC, in 2010, the states with the most murders per 100,000 people are:

1. Louisiana (4.44)
2. Mississippi (4.13)
3. Alabama (3.85)
4. New Mexico (3.69)
5. South Carolina (3.57)
6. Arkansas (3.48)
7. Nevada (3.48)
8. Georgia (3.32)
9. Tennessee (3.1)
10. North Carolina (3.07)
Stalking doesn’t always lead to violence, but it can. Even still, stalking is far less common than sexual assault but worth mentioning. This is the percentage of women in 2010 who reported having been stalked in their lifetimes.

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In Kentucky, the state with the highest percent of incidents, 19% of women report being stalked. Most states see an 11-13% rate of stalking, while the states with the lowest instances, Wisconsin and Virginia, see a rate of 9.8% and 8.6% respectively. The states with the highest percentage of women who have been stalked are:

1. Kentucky (19%)
2. Alabama (18.4%)
3. Nevada (17.7%)
4. Oklahoma (16.6%)
5. New Mexico (16.4%)
6. North Carolina (16%)
7. Tennessee (15.3%)
8. Wyoming (15.2%)
9. Mississippi (15.1%)
10. Pennsylvania (15%)

Four out of every five assaults are committed by someone the victim already knows (a friend, boyfriend, acquaintance, etc), and one third of women are assaulted by an intimate partner. The 2010 report shows the sheer number of women who reported being assaulted by an intimate partner within their lifetimes.

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Considering 94% of women who are murdered and four fifths of women who are raped are attacked by someone they know, these statistics are particularly telling. These states have the highest percentage of women who have been raped, physically assaulted, or stalked by an intimate partner.

1. Oklahoma (36.8%)
2. Nevada (34.8%)
3. North Carolina (33%)
4. Michigan (32.5%)
5. Washington (32.4%)
6. Maryland (32%)
7. New Hampshire (32%)
8. Alaska (32%)
9. South Carolina (31.7%)
10. Tennessee (30.6%)
When labeling the most dangerous places for women, it may also be important to consider a woman’s mental health. A cluster of states seem to have had a notably higher suicide rate between 2004 and 2010.

If the attack is on oneself, versus a homicide or physical assault from another party, does it still count? Regardless of genetic predisposition to depression and self-harm, situations that lead a woman to suicide are perhaps indicators of an unhealthy environment.

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States with highest rates of suicide per 100,000 people are:
1. Alaska (9.62)
2. Nevada (9..62)
3. Wyoming (8.19)
4. New Mexico (8.06)
5. Montana (7.96)
6. Colorado (7.76)
7. Oregon (7.23)
8. Arizona (7.18)
9. Florida (6.40)
10. Idaho (6.31)
The problem is still growing, which is why we need more information.

Despite the most comprehensive and accurate report being from 2010, the frequency of rape among women has not decreased. According to the FBI, the figures rose 1.6% between 2013 and 2014. This leads us to the question, why isn’t there a more recent CDC study on domestic abuse if the problem is growing? How many women will really be assaulted (sexually or otherwise) in their lifetimes? How many women were actually affected within the last year alone and didn’t report it to the police?

Perhaps if people are more aware of the massive scale of the problem, it could help lead to a change. For every woman who says it can never happen to me, who truly believes it’s only a problem for a few unfortunate people, there is another woman who understands that it can happen to anyone and it does happen to anyone, even if she remains silent in her understanding.

There is help out there for women who find themselves in trouble. If you need help and you’re in the U.S., call 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) for the National Domestic Violence Hotline or 1-800-656-HOPE (4673) for the National Sexual Assault Hotline.

After her dad publicly shames her in YouTube video, 13-year-old Washington girl jumps off overpass

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http://www.dailykos.com/story/2015/06/05/1390844/-After-her-dad-publicly-shames-her-in-YouTube-video-13-year-old-Washington-girl-jumps-off-overpass

Izabel Laxamana, a 13-year-old girl in Tacoma, Washington died by suicide after jumping off a highway overpass on Friday, May 29. Days before, Laxamana’s father Jeff had reportedly punished her for an unspecified transgression by cutting off her hair and uploading a video to YouTube. There’s now a controversy brewing online and among the girl’s friends and family over whether the video caused her death.
Tacoma’s News Tribune reports that the girl, who they don’t identify by name, exited a car and jumped off a bridge onto Interstate 5. She was taken to a Seattle hospital, where she died on Saturday. Friends of the Laxamana family are now raising money for funeral costs on a GoFundMe site.

Her father deleted the original :15 second video from YouTube, but not before a friend of Izabel’s recorded it and reposted it:

While people are questioning whether her suicide was the result of being publicly shamed, it is clear from accounts of friends and family that Izabel suffered from depression and anxiety. In August 2014 when she posted to her Google+ account:
I feel hated most of the time im in school i feel looked down on and i get judged alot…. But what keeps me going is people like kian who have gone through the same thing as me… In a school with so many people its weird to say “i feel alone” but the truth is that you really do feel alone. So thanks for everything kian….
Nonetheless, friends posted the video as a warning for parents about the consequences of public shaming videos. And the debate rages on about whether these types of videos are a form of abuse. Either way, a beautiful young girl has lost her life and her friends and family are left to pick up the pieces.

Written by protectivemothersallianceinternational

June 9, 2015 at 5:15 am

Darren Hayes: ‘We are all Robin Williams’ / Attitude

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This beautifully written post originally appeared on Attitude and was authored by the very talented artist Darren Hayes. Thank you Darren. We are re posting in memory of the late Robin Williams, and for all protective mothers struggling with situational depression due to the pain and injustice suffered. If you are feeling depressed, please tell a trusted someone, reach out and get help. One day your children will come back to you . They need a living, healthy mother to reunite with, and love.
R.I.P Robin Williams you are love by the world..

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The hardest, most debilitating and soul-devouring aspect of depression is the self-imposed choice to hide it away from the world.

In the place of the cold, utterly dark void that we feel inside, people who suffer from depression will use secret stores of energy they don’t have, energy that could be used to solve their problems or seek help, to put a mask of happiness on to fool the world.

I was diagnosed with my first depressive disorder in my mid-twenties.

There have been times in my life where I’ve been suicidal and thank God the people around me noticed and begged me to seek medical help.

I’m so glad I did and continue to.

The last few years have been a journey for me to take control of my happiness. I chose to deal with my depression in a practical sense and to take back my life from the insufferable and greedy clutches of darkness. I cried with grief earlier this year at the realisation that there were seven years of my life I lost. From 2007 until recently I had suffered my longest battle with depression. A saga so debilitating, which became so commonplace, that I forgot what it felt like to be free of that feeling of dread. Waking most days feeling sick to the stomach with worry and anxiety had become so familiar I had come to accept it. For some periods that feeling would ease after a few hours. But for some months, it would linger 24/7. There were periods of six months or more over the past seven years that depression was so consuming that it was in fact joy that seemed alien to me. A vague memory of a past life perhaps. That was not living. That was like being a zombie. Walking through life, feigning happiness but often looking on the outside of life peering in.

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There’s so much shame and guilt associated with depression. The judgment from my own self would say things like ‘You have a blessed life. You have love, you have a career, you have money. How dare you be sad’. But depression isn’t rational. It’s like being thrust into outer space, spun in a tumble dryer and then expecting to know which way is up. You don’t. You can’t possibly. Your compass is not just off, it’s broken and smashed into a million vengeful pieces.

I’m glad I’ve always been open about my mental illness. I really believe transparency is a life-saver. Suffering in silence is the beginning of disappearing silently. And I refuse to go quietly into that dark light.

I am so glad I’m alive. I’m so glad I know to always expect another sunrise, and on the nights I can’t imagine ever being happy again, I’m so glad there’s medication, therapy or friends and family I can turn to, to help me get my compass back to pointing true north.

I, like many people, have been so moved by the death of Robin Williams because in many ways he reminds me of myself. Maybe he reminds us of ourselves. Life can seem like a struggle and can at times seem cruel. We look to artists like Robin Williams to make us laugh, to relieve that burden and to encourage us to dream. We never realise they create art and work for the same reason we do – to escape. We don’t stop to think they’re fragile just like us.

We are all Robin Williams. We are all unique, wonderful, brilliant and essential characters in the play of life. Let’s never forget to reach out to each other and remind the person next to us of this fact. Without you in it there’s no point to the story.

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Written by protectivemothersallianceinternational

August 12, 2014 at 10:04 pm

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